Masculinity in Bond Villains: The reference of homosexuality by ‘queer-coded’ male characters as a tool for violence and manipulation in 007 – does it have to be this way?

Screen shot from Skyfall (2012) directed by Sam Mendes, Eon Productions. Image features James Bond (Daniel Craig) and Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem).

In this blog, I will look at how queer-coded masculinity is portrayed in the villains in James Bond films Casino Royale (2006) directed by Martin Campbell and Skyfall directed by Sam Mendes (2012). In particular I will look at La Chiffre in Casino Royale (played by Mads Mikkelsen) and Raoul Silva in Skyfall (played by Javier Bardem). Focusing on the torture and interrogation scenes from these films, I will consider the significance of mockingly ‘queer-coded’ behaviour of the villains included in the films, such as innuendos and homosexual references used to torture and manipulate Bond (played by Daniel Craig).

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It’s time to change: Why as a small business owner, I’m trying to source sustainable and ethical products for my online store (and why I’m hoping other retailers do the same).

‘Bi love’ Mens/Unisex organic cotton t-shirt from the Bi in the 2000s™ merchandise range

Like everyone, I’m trying my best. My business is relatively new, every step of the way is a huge learning curve, and I’m really trying to put a sustainable and ethical foot forward from the very beginning of the launch of the merchandise products that I’ve created, which I’m approaching in the following ways:

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Is the LGBTQ+ Pride flag used commercially as a means to gentrify cities, or to celebrate diversity?

H&M shop front in London, 2017, during Pride month (mynoho.co.uk)

Is the LGBTQ+ Pride flag used commercially as a means to gentrify cities, or does it celebrate diversity? Regardless of whether you see the cultural appropriation of the LGBTQ+ Pride movement for commercial use as something positive or something negative, some urban theorists have actively encouraged creating a space that will attract LGBTQ+, with the intent of gentrifying the area.

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Pride flag: How useful is it see the rainbow LGBTQ+ Pride flag used on commercial logos and packaging?

LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender) Pride flag – Red Dragon  Flagmakers
LGBTQ+ Pride flag

So you want to support LGBTQ+? You’ve bought your bacon, lettuce and tomato rainbow flag sandwich from M&S, you’ve bought your apple with a rainbow flag sticker for lunch from Pink Lady, you’ve bought your coffee in a rainbow coloured coffee holder from Starbucks, you’ve bought your rainbow trainers from Nike, you’ve been there, you’ve spent your money, you’ve got the proverbial t-shirt (from adidas). And how do you feel now? Do you feel proud to be you? Proud to support the LGBTQ+ community? Do you feel proud to embrace the side of you, that doesn’t necessarily fit into the hetero-normative narrative that we all have to love the same way? Or do you feel like a few trans-national corporations have just burnt a large hole in your wallet, you’ve continued to contribute to the global capitalist economy, and you’re still afraid to kiss someone that’s the same gender as you in public, for fear of public shame and discrimination?

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‘Bi love’ from the Bi in the 2000s™ merchandise range

‘Bi love’ design from the Bi in the 2000s™ merchandise range

This painting represents about how I feel about bisexuality now, and LGBTQ+ love is definitely included in this. The painting was initially titled ‘Happy Bisexuality Visibility Day’ and was released on social media on this day, 23rd September, 2020.

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‘Who do I sit with?’ from the Bi in the 2000s™ illustrative series – set in a night club in the 2000s

‘Who do I sit with?’ from the Bi in the 2000s™ illustrative series

I chose to include a painting set in a club in the UK in the 2000s as I felt that as a teenager and young adult, club scenes felt like there was a particular kind of intensity around 1.) what you looked like, and 2.) who you had feelings for. From memory (I stopped going to these kinds of places a while ago, although I respect people that still go), the clubs that I attended (these tended to be varied, but never specifically ‘gay’ or ‘lgbtq’ clubs) were never spaces where people were openly anything other than heterosexual.

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Why is representation and seeing others ‘like you’ in the culture around you important, especially when growing up?

Image: ‘World’ by Anna Frances from the Bi in the 2000s™ illustrative series.

Anna Frances explores further why she thinks seeing someone ‘like you’ in the culture around you, effects how you see yourself, and also can effect how you see others.

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5 reasons why I LOVE the Bi in the 2000s™ merchandise range (and why you will too)

Pictured: Design from the ‘Journey’ organic cotton t-shirt and tote bag

Artist Anna Frances shares why she LOVES the Bi in the 2000s™ merchandise range, (and why you will too).

1.) Each design is from the Bi in the 2000s™ illustrative series that I’ve created, which helps to promote Bisexuality bisibility and LGBTQ+ visibility more broadly.

Why I love it: I think representation around LGBTQ+ communities and Bisexuality communities is urgently needed, and I think that art is a really important way to address that.

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Bristol Art Tour introduction: Clifton Suspension Bridge

Image credit (right): @louisedoeslife unsplash.com

Bristol Arts Tour: Touring my home city, Bristol! And showcasing the Bi in the 2000s™ merch on my travels 😊

I’ve often felt that being a creative and an artist in Bristol seemed quite significant, based on a lot of the iconic art and culture that’s already in the city around me. Although every artist is very different, it certainly does make me feel like I’m part of something exciting, and I’m always inspired to come across new art work in the place where I live.

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(2/9) ‘Pop Culture’

In this post, I share how I feel about (2/9) ‘Pop Culture,’ the second painting from the Bi in the 2000s™ illustrative series.

What inspired you to paint this painting?

I felt at the time at school, and still feel to a large extent, that popular culture has a huge influence on how we often view our own identity, particularly as a teenager and young adult. I chose to include the musical artist referenced in the painting as a historical reference, not an endorsement. In the late 2000s, certainly in the UK at the time, I was aware that there were a few (predominantly female musical artists) to ‘come out’ as either bisexual or pansexual. This painting represents the complete lack of awareness I had about bisexuality before this happened in the culture around me. I’m aware that not everyone will agree with this or relate to this, this is just from my own perspective, and I thought it was interesting to explore these themes in this painting.

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