Masculinity in Bond Villains: The reference of homosexuality by ‘queer-coded’ male characters as a tool for violence and manipulation in 007 – does it have to be this way?

Screen shot from Skyfall (2012) directed by Sam Mendes, Eon Productions. Image features James Bond (Daniel Craig) and Raoul Silva (Javier Bardem).

In this blog, I will look at how queer-coded masculinity is portrayed in the villains in James Bond films Casino Royale (2006) directed by Martin Campbell and Skyfall directed by Sam Mendes (2012). In particular I will look at La Chiffre in Casino Royale (played by Mads Mikkelsen) and Raoul Silva in Skyfall (played by Javier Bardem). Focusing on the torture and interrogation scenes from these films, I will consider the significance of mockingly ‘queer-coded’ behaviour of the villains included in the films, such as innuendos and homosexual references used to torture and manipulate Bond (played by Daniel Craig).

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Why I think infantilising ‘femininity’ in mainstream media and Hollywood is damaging to both men and women (and why I think it’s ok to be a woman).

Snow White (character)/Gallery | Snow white characters, Snow white disney, Snow  white
Image: Pintrest

In this blog I explore the impact of ‘infantilising’ femininity, which has often been taught to us through mainstream media, popular culture and children’s entertainment. By this term, I mean showing women as incredibly young to the point of child-like, with no wrinkles, small waist and big bust, character traits that include naivety, ‘innocence,’ never setting any boundaries, letting everything happen to her without any awareness, being at the man’s beck and call, being reliant on the male gaze’s approval, seeking assurance from men, having less money and property than men (or none at all), and any ‘fierceness’ in characters, often portraying women fighting against the dominating father figure, attempting to ‘fight the patriarchy’ by sacrificing herself for her father’s unhappiness.

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It’s time to change: Why as a small business owner, I’m trying to source sustainable and ethical products for my online store (and why I’m hoping other retailers do the same).

‘Bi love’ Mens/Unisex organic cotton t-shirt from the Bi in the 2000s™ merchandise range

Like everyone, I’m trying my best. My business is relatively new, every step of the way is a huge learning curve, and I’m really trying to put a sustainable and ethical foot forward from the very beginning of the launch of the merchandise products that I’ve created, which I’m approaching in the following ways:

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Is the LGBTQ+ Pride flag used commercially as a means to gentrify cities, or to celebrate diversity?

H&M shop front in London, 2017, during Pride month (mynoho.co.uk)

Is the LGBTQ+ Pride flag used commercially as a means to gentrify cities, or does it celebrate diversity? Regardless of whether you see the cultural appropriation of the LGBTQ+ Pride movement for commercial use as something positive or something negative, some urban theorists have actively encouraged creating a space that will attract LGBTQ+, with the intent of gentrifying the area.

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WTAF? Is it a Banksy? Or rather, was it a Banksy?

Photo taken by Anna Frances, 1 Oct 2019 on Chandos Road, Bristol

Following the trip to see the Banksy mural ‘Naked man, hanging from window’ on College Green on my Bristol Art Tour yesterday, it reminded me of some street art that I’d found a few years ago, that looked like a Banksy.. but was it? I can’t find anything about it online.

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Bristol Art Tour: Banksy Mural – Naked man, hanging from window

Well Hung Lover.jpg
‘Naked man, hanging from window’ Banksy mural. Image: Wikipedia

Following the visit to Bristol’s oldest art gallery, the RWA, I then took my Bristol Arts Tour to College Green in Bristol, to see the ‘Naked man, hanging from window’ Banksy art mural, painted on the side of a sexual health clinic.

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Bristol Art Tour: RWA – Bristol’s oldest art gallery, Ellen Sharples and Rolinda Sharples

Self portrait of Rolinda Sharples and her mother Ellen in the background (source: Wikipedia)

Following the introduction at Clifton Suspension Bridge yesterday, day two of my tour around Bristol brings me to the RWA and Bristol School of Art, which was Bristol’s first art gallery.

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(2/9) ‘Pop Culture’

In this post, I share how I feel about (2/9) ‘Pop Culture,’ the second painting from the Bi in the 2000s™ illustrative series.

What inspired you to paint this painting?

I felt at the time at school, and still feel to a large extent, that popular culture has a huge influence on how we often view our own identity, particularly as a teenager and young adult. I chose to include the musical artist referenced in the painting as a historical reference, not an endorsement. In the late 2000s, certainly in the UK at the time, I was aware that there were a few (predominantly female musical artists) to ‘come out’ as either bisexual or pansexual. This painting represents the complete lack of awareness I had about bisexuality before this happened in the culture around me. I’m aware that not everyone will agree with this or relate to this, this is just from my own perspective, and I thought it was interesting to explore these themes in this painting.

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